Cumaseba (Swartzia polyphylla) bark extract - Cumaseba (Swartzia polyphylla) - Cumaseba (Swartzia polyphylla) bark extract Cumaseba Extract

Swartzia polyphylla

This product is no longer sold by Raintree Nutrition, Inc. See the main product page for more information why. Try doing a google search for products available from other suppliers or see the rainforest products page to find other companies selling rainforest herbal supplements or rainforest plants if you want to make this rainforest formula yourself.

Cumaseba is a tropical rainforest tree that grows up to 15 meters high. It can be found in lower elevations throughout the Amazon basin area in Brazil, Peru, Colombia, Venezuela and the three Guianas. Cumaseba has a long history of use among the Indians and local people in the Amazon for muscle and joint pain.* For more information about cumaseba (Swartzia polyphylla), please refer to the Database File for Cumaseba in the Tropical Plant Database. More information can also be found in the new Antimicrobial Guide. To see photographs of cumaseba click here. Check out the new Discussion Forums to see if anyone is talking about how they are using this natural rainforest remedy.

Traditional Uses:* for rheumatism and arthritis; for painful and/or inflamed joint, muscle and/or bone conditions; as a female hormonal tonic and aphrodisiac; for candida, yeast infections and fungal infections; for colds, flu, tuberculosis and other upper respiratory bacterial infections

Suggested Use: Take 60 drops 2 - 3 times daily or as needed. Can also be used externally by applying to the skin twice daily and letting dry completely. Cumaseba is best prepared as an alcohol tincture. For more complete instructions on preparing your own herbal tinctures see the Methods for Preparing Herbal Remedies Page.

Contraindications: None known.

Drug Interactions: None known.





Third-Party Published Research*

All available third-party research on cumaseba can be found at PubMed. A partial listing of the published research on cumaseba is shown below:

Antibacterial & Antiviral Actions:
Scientists have confirmed through in vitro testing that cumaseba is a good antimicrobial. It has been reported to kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis, including several antibiotic-resistant strains, the stomach bacteria linked to ulcers and stomach cancer, H. pylori, several types of mouth bacteria that cause cavities and gingivitis, and other gram-positive strains of bacteria.
Sithisarn, P., et al. "Differential antiviral and anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the flavonoids biochanin A and baicalein in H5N1 influenza A virus-infected cells." Antiviral Res. 2012 Oct 23.
Rojas, R., et al. “Anti-mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of Peruvian plants.” Plant Med. 2004: 101.
Rojas, R., et al. “Larvicidal, antimycobacterial and antifungal compounds from the bark of the Peruvian plant Swartzia polyphylla DC.” Chem. Pharm. Bull. 2006; 54(2): 278-279.
Herforth, A., et al. “Antifungal plants of the Peruvian Amazon: A survey of ethnomedical uses and biological activity.” Cornel University Publication 2002.
Osawa, K., et al. “Isoflavanones from the heartwood of Swartzia polyphylla and their antibacterial activity against cariogenic bacteria.” Chem. Pharm. Bull. 1992; 40(11): 2970-2974.
Du Bois, J. L., et al. “Dihydrolicoisoflavone, a new isoflavanone from Swartzia polyphylla.” J. Nat. Prod. 1995: 58(4): 629-632.

Antifungal & Anticandidal Actions:
Cumaseba has been documented to have actions against fungus and Candida. Most of these researchers have attributed the antimicrobial actions of cumaseba to its isoflavone chemicals.
Rojas, R., et al. “Larvicidal, antimycobacterial and antifungal compounds from the bark of the Peruvian plant Swartzia polyphylla DC.” Chem. Pharm. Bull. 2006; 54(2): 278-279.
Herforth, A., et al. “Antifungal plants of the Peruvian Amazon: A survey of ethnomedical uses and biological activity.” Cornel University Publication 2002.
Du Bois, J. L., et al. “Dihydrolicoisoflavone, a new isoflavanone from Swartzia polyphylla.” J. Nat. Prod. 1995: 58(4): 629-632.

Protein Kinase C Inhibition Actions:
Du Bois, J. L., et al. “Dihydrolicoisoflavone, a new isoflavanone from Swartzia polyphylla.” J. Nat. Prod. 1995: 58(4): 629-632.
Du Bois, J. L., et al. “Fereirinol, a new 3-hydroxyisoflavanone from Swartzia polyphylla.” J. Nat. Prod. 1996; 59(9): 902-903.

Anti-inflammatory Actions:
Kole, L., et al. "Biochanin-A, an isoflavon, showed anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory activities through the inhibition of iNOS expression, p38-MAPK and ATF-2 phosphorylation and blocking NF?B nuclear translocation." Eur J Pharmacol. 2011 Feb 25;653(1-3):8-15
Sithisarn, P., et al. "Differential antiviral and anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the flavonoids biochanin A and baicalein in H5N1 influenza A virus-infected cells." Antiviral Res. 2012 Oct 23.

Cytotoxic Actions:
Noel, R., et al. “Anti-tumour screening of Brazilian plants.” Pharma. Biol. 2002; 40(8): 603-616.


* The statements contained herein have not been evaluated
by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is
not intended to treat, cure, mitigate or prevent any disease.
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Last updated 12-31-2012