Huacapurana - Campsiandra angustifolia Cumanda Huacapurana - Campsiandra angustifolia - Cumanda

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Huacapurana
(Campsiandra angustifolia)

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Huacapurana - Campsiandra angustifolia - Cumanda
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Huacapurana

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  • Family: Fabaceae or Caesalpiniaceae
    Taxon: Campsiandra angustifolia Spruce ex Bentham
    Synonyms: none
    Related Species: Campsiandra comosa and Campsiandra laurifolia
    Common names: huacapurana, acapurana, acapu-do-igapo, apikara, caacapoc, cumandá, gapo
    Parts Used: Bark


    Huacapurana
    HERBAL PROPERTIES AND ACTIONS
    Main Actions Other Actions Standard Dosage
  • febrifuge
  • anti-ulcer
  • Bark
  • tonic
  •   Tincture or Decoction
  • antiarthritic
  •    
  • vulnerary
  •    

    Huacapurana is a medium-sized tree that grows alongside rivers and streams in the Amazon Basin. The Peruvian common name, huacapurana, can apply to three different closely related species of Amazonian trees that are used interchangeably by local inhabitants: Campsiandra angustifolia, C. comosa, and C. laurifolia. When used in Peruvian herbal medicine, the "authentic huacapurana" is considered to be Campsiandra angustifolia. All three are medium sized trees which produce small white to pinkish flowers with red stamens. These trees (as most Campsiandra trees) produce a large bean pod. The seeds are commonly removed from the pod, dried, and then ground into a flour or meal as a food for both people and livestock. This flour is commonly referred to as "chigo-flour."

    TRIBAL AND HERBAL MEDICINE USES

    Huacapurana (all three species) is a common remedy for malarial fever in Peruvian Amazon. In the Iquitos region, local herbalists and curanderos recommend a decoction or a tincture of the bark to be taken twice daily to reduce the fever related to malaria. In herbal medicine systems in Peru, huacapurana is also recommended for arthritis and rheumatism, diarrhea, as a tonic, and for other feverish conditions. The Witoto Indians in the area use the pulverized bark of C. laurifolia to treat wounds. Locals in the Loreto district of Peru have used a bark tea of C. comosa as a postpartum tonic. In Brazil the tree goes by the common name of cumandá or acapurana and herbalists recommend the bark of C. comosa as a tonic, for malarial fever, and to clean sores and ulcers.

    PLANT CHEMICALS

    The chemicals in huacapurana bark have not been fully studied or reported. There have been no chemical analyses published in any peer-reviewed journal to date. It is believed to contain anthocyanins, cyanogenic glucosides, heterosides, saponins, and tannins.

    BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITIES AND CLINICAL RESEARCH

    There have been no laboratory studies or clinical research published on huacapurana bark in any peer-reviewed journals or publications. A university in Ecuador was paid to run several studies on a U.S. manufactured huacapurana extract by the company marketing this extract. To date, these studies have not been published in any independent journal or subjected to peer review.

    CURRENT PRACTICAL USES

    Currently, only one product is available in the U.S. market today for huacapurana. It is being widely touted for Lyme's Disease as well as a host of other microbial issues and diseases. None of these claims can be substantiated by independent third-party documentation or published research, nor even by traditional use. Consumers should ask for a money-back guarantee in the event that this product does not live up to its far-reaching marketing claims.



    HUACAPURANA PLANT SUMMARY
    Main Preparation Method: tincture or decoction

    Main Actions (in order):
    febrifuge, tonic, antiarthritic, vulnerary, antiulcerous

    Main Uses:

    1. for fevers (malaria)
    2. for arthritis and rheumatism
    3. for wounds
    4. for ulcers
    5. as a tonic
    Properties/Actions Documented by Research: None.

    Other Properties/Actions Documented by Traditional Use:
    antiarthritic, antiulcerous, febrifuge, tonic, vulnerary

    Cautions:None known.



    Traditional Preparation: Traditionally, huacapurana bark is prepared as an alcoholic tincture or as a decoction. See Traditional Herbal Remedies Preparation Methods page if necessary for definitions.

    Contraindications: None known.

    Drug Interactions: None known.



    WORLDWIDE ETHNOMEDICAL USES
    Brazil as a tonic, for malarial fever, sores, ulcers
    Peru for arthritis, fevers, malaria, rheumatism, wounds


    The above text has been authored by Leslie Taylor and copyrighted © 2006. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage or retrieval system, including websites, without written permission.

    * The statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The information contained in this plant database file is intended for education, entertainment and information purposes only. This information is not intended to be used to diagnose, prescribe or replace proper medical care. The plant described herein is not intended to treat, cure, diagnose, mitigate or prevent any disease. Please refer to our Conditions of Use for using this plant database file and web site.




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    Last updated 12-17-2012