Jatoba, Hymenaea, courbaril, coubaril,  energy, herbs, products, alternative, health, remedies, medicinal, plants, herbal, natural, Jatoba, Hymenaea, courbaril, coubaril,  energy, herbs, products, alternative, health, remedies, medicinal, plants, herbal, natural Jatoba Extract

Hymenaea courbaril

This product is no longer sold by Raintree Nutrition, Inc. See the main product page for more information why. Try doing a google search or see the rainforest products page to find other companies selling rainforest herbal supplements or rainforest plants if you want to make this rainforest formula yourself.

Jatoba is used throughout the Amazon rainforest for a quick boost of natural energy without any caffeine or other harmful stimulants.* Chemical analysis of jatoba shows that it is rich in biologically active compounds including diterpenes, sesquiterpenes, flavonoids, and oligosaccharides. Some of these chemicals (such as copalic acid, delta-cadinene, caryophyllene and alpha-humulene) have shown to exhibit antifungal, antiyeast, and antibacterial actions in independent laboratory studies.*

For more complete information on this unique rainforest plant, please see the plant database file on jatoba in the Tropical Plant Database. More information can also be found in the new Antimicrobial Guide. To see pictures of jatoba, click here. Check out the new Discussion Forums to see if anyone is talking about how they are using this natural rainforest remedy.

Traditional Uses: for candida and yeast infections; for fungal infections (athlete's foot, nail fungus, etc.); for prostatitis; for cystitis and urinary tract infections; as a natural stimulant and energy tonic (tones, balances, strengthens overall body functions)

Suggested Use: Take 2 ml of a 1:4 concentrated extract 2 or more times daily.
Contraindications: Not to be used during pregnancy or breast-feeding.
Drug Interactions: None known.
Other Practitioner Observations: Jatobá can provide a significant energy lift to some people. Take prior to 4 pm to avoid sleep disturbances.





Third-Party Published Research*

All available third-party research on jatobá can be found at PubMed. A partial listing of the published research on jatobá is shown below:

Anticandidal & Antifungal Actions:
Chemical analysis of jatoba shows that it is rich in biologically active compounds including diterpenes, sesquiterpenes, flavonoids, and oligosaccharides. The bark contains copalic acid, delta-cadinene, caryo-phyllene and alpha-humulene which have shown to exhibit significant antibacterial and antifungal actions in laboratory studies. These antifungal terpenes and phenolics, which also occur in other medicinal plants, have been documented in several studies over the years and the antifungal activity of jatoba is attributed to these chemicals.
Cavin, A., "Bioactive diterpenes from the fruits of Detarium microcarpum." J. Nat. Prod. 2006; 69(5): 768-73.
Abdel-Kader, M., et al. “Isolation and absolute configuration of ent-Halimane diterpenoids from Hymenaea courbaril from the Suriname rain forest.” J. Nat. Prod. 2002; 65(1): 11-5.
Yang, D., et al. “Use of caryophyllene oxide as an antifungal agent in an in vitro experimental model of onychomycosis.” Mycopathologia. 1999; 148(2): 79–82.
Hostettmann, K., et al. “Phytochemistry of plants used in traditional medicine.” Proceedings of the Phytochemical Society of Europe. Clarendon Press, Oxford. 1995.
Rahalison, L., et al. “Screening for antifungal activity of Panamanian plants.” Inst. J. Pharmacog. 1993; 31(1): 68–76.
Verpoorte, R., et al. “Medicinal plants of Surinam. IV. Antimicrobial activity of some medicinal plants.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 1987; 21(3): 315–18.
Arrhenius, S.P., et al. “Inhibitory effects of Hymenaea and Copaifera leaf resins on the leaf fungus, Pestalotia subcuticulari.” Biochem. Syst. Ecol. 1983; 11(4): 361–66.
Giral, F., et al. “Ethnopharmacognostic observation on Panamanian medicinal plants. Part 1.” Q. J. Crude Drug Res. 1979; 167(3/4): 115–30.
Marsaioli, A. J., et al. “Diterpenes in the bark of Hymenaea courbaril.Phytochemistry. 1975; 14: 1882–83.
Pinheiro de Sousa, M., et al. “Molluscicidal activity of plants from Northeast Brazil.” Rev. Bras. Pesq. Med. Biol. 1974; 7(4): 389–94.

Other Antimicrobial & Antimalarial Actions:
Laboratory studies have been performed on jatoba since the early 1970s which have shown that it has antimicrobial, molluscicidal, and antibacterial activities, including in vitro actions against such organisms as E. coli, Psuedomonas, Staphylococcus, and Bacillus.
Cecilio, A., et al. "Screening of Brazilian medicinal plants for antiviral activity against rotavirus." J Ethnopharmacol. 2012 Jun 14;141(3):975-81.
Tincusi, B. M., et al. “Antimicrobial terpenoids from the oleoresin of the Peruvian medicinal plant Copaifera paupera.” Planta Med. 2002; 68(9): 808–12.
Kohler, I., et al. “In vitro antiplasmodial investigation of medicinal plants from El Salvador.” Z. Naturforsch. 2002; 57(3-4): 277-81.
Hostettmann, K., et al. “Phytochemistry of plants used in traditional medicine.” Proceedings of the Phytochemical Society of Europe. Clarendon Press, Oxford. 1995.
Denyer, C. V., et al. “Isolation of antirhinoviral sesquiterpenes from ginger (Zingiber officinale).” J. Nat. Prod. 1994; 57(5): 658–62.
Muroi, H., et al. “Combination effects of antibacterial compounds in green tea flavor against Streptococcus mutans.” J. Agric. Food Chem. 1993; 41: 1102–5.
Caceres, A., et al. “Plants used in Guatemala for the treatment of dermatomucosal infections. 1: Screening of 38 plant extracts.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 1991; 33(3):277–83.
Verpoorte, R., et al. “Medicinal plants of Surinam. IV. Antimicrobial activity of some medicinal plants.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 1987; 21(3): 315–18.
Rouquayrol, M. Z., et al. “Molluscicidal activity of essential oils from Northeastern Brazilian plants.” Rev. Brasil Pesq. Med. Biol. 1980; 13: 135–43.

Antioxidant Actions:
Sasaki, K., et al. "High-performance liquid chromatographic purification of oligomeric procyanidins, trimers up to nonamers, derived from the bark of Jatoba (Hymenaea courbaril)." Biosci Biotechnol Biochem. 2009 Jun;73(6):1274-9.
Closa, D., et al. “Prostanoids and free radicals in CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity in rats: effect of astilbin.” Prostaglandins Leukot. Essent. Fatty Acids. 1997; 56(4): 331–34.
Lopez, J. A. “Isolation of astilbin and sitosterol from Hymenaea courbaril.” Phytochemistry 1976; 15: 2027F.

Anti-inflammatory Actions:
Veiga Junior, V. F., et al. "The inhibition of paw oedema formation caused by the oil of Copaifera multijuga Hayne and its fractions." J. Pharm. Pharmacol. 2006; 58(10): 1405-10.
Basile, A. C., et al. "Anti-inflammatory activity of oleoresin from Brazilian Copaifera." J. Ethnopharmacol. 1988; 22(1): 101-9.





* The statements contained herein have not been evaluated
by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is
not intended to treat, cure, mitigate or prevent any disease.
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Last updated 12-31-2012